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Advent - Week 2: PEACE

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Beginning the Church's liturgical year, Advent (from, "ad-venire" in Latin or "to come to") is the season encompassing the four Sundays (and weekdays) leading up to the celebration of Christmas.

The Advent season is a time of preparation that directs our hearts and minds to Christ’s second coming at the end of time and also to the anniversary of the Lord’s birth on Christmas. The final days of Advent, from December 17 to December 24, focus particularly on our preparation for the celebrations of the Nativity of our Lord (Christmas).

Advent devotions including the Advent wreath, remind us of the meaning of the season. Our Advent calendar can help you fully enter into the season with daily activity and prayer suggestions to prepare you spiritually for the birth of Jesus Christ.  Click for more Advent resources  (from the United States Catholic Conference of Bishops website) and St. Paschal Catholic Church-ADVENT.

                    

CLICK on each week to view more Advent resources 

                              

      ADVENT WEEK ONE                     ADVENT WEEK TWO

              Advent1- Hope                                           Advent2- Peace                     

Advent Wreath 2018

 ADVENT WREATHS Advent-wreath

Origins and Meaning of Wreaths

The Advent wreath is an old German tradition that has gained much popularity in the last few years. Most Christian homes and communities practice this custom during the Advent season. This sacramental is rich in meaning, is easy to implement and can either be simple, costing little, or very elaborate, costing more, handmade or storebought, with fresh greenery, or permanent greens.

The Advent wreath is a wreath, or circle, of evergreens, made in various sizes. It is either suspended from the ceiling by ribbons (preferably purple) or placed on a table. The devotion is usually incorporated during the family meal, or during family night prayers. Fastened to the wreath are four candles standing upright, at equal distances. These candles represent the four weeks of Advent. Three of the candles are purple, reminding us of the penitential nature of the season. A rose or pink candle is lit for the Third Sunday of Advent, also known as Gaudete (rejoice) Sunday. The name is taken from the entrance antiphon or Introit "Rejoice (gaudete) in the Lord always, again I say, rejoice." It is reminding us that the end of Advent is almost here, and we can hardly contain our joy.

The wreath should be in a circle, a symbol of eternity, and a reminder that God has no beginning nor end. The evergreen is a symbol of eternal life and a reminder that God is immutable or unchangeable.

The appearance of the actual Advent wreath is varied—everyone has their own interpretation of the Advent wreath. The look of your family's wreath depends on how much time and creativity you have to devote. Your family can create their own special wreath, or add personal touches to a store-bought wreath.

- From CatholicCulture.org.  Click for more information and how to make a wreath :

Meaning of Candles

Various meanings have been assigned to the four candles. One interpretation has each candle representing 4000 years, the Biblical time between Adam and Eve and the coming of Christ. In another interpretation, the first candle represents the patriarchs, the second the prophets, the third reminds us of John the Baptist, and the fourth of Mary, the mother of Jesus. They have also been described as the prophets’ candle, the Bethlehem Candle, the shepherds’ candle, and the angels’ candle.

A fifth white candle in the center representing Christ can also be used. It is lit on Christmas Eve as a remembrance of Christ coming into the world. Sometimes, all the other candles of the wreath are removed and replaced with white candles on Christmas.  (from http://catholicexchange.com/history-advent-wreath

Click to visit  United States Conference of Catholic Bishops for more resources on Advent.

Mission Statement

SPCCbellt 1198w10Centered on the Gospel of the Lord, we West Ouachita Catholics are a community committed to being  a positive and life-giving presence to one another and to our world - a presence witnessed by our vibrant worship, our deep love for the poor, our heartfelt concern for the spiritual growth  of Catholics of all ages,  and our cordial welcome of everyone  we meet.  We are further committed to help each church member discover and develop their God-given talents for ministry,  in the imitation of Jesus Christ.